Some comments on The Anarchist’s Design Book

Some comments on The Anarchist’s Design Book:

Which brings me to my final point. Schwarz has been one of my favorite go-to writers for matters of technique for well over a decade. With this book, (and to be honest, this really snuck up on me) he’s also suddenly sitting as one of my favorite designers. These pieces are all based in historical research, and standing on the shoulders of centuries of other makers – but the results are, to my eye, most definitely his. I’ve been looking at iterations of the desk and chair above, both in photos and in person, for months now, and I think they’re some of my favorite designs of recent memory. And they’ve only gotten more appealing to me over time – which, to me, is the key hallmark of really good design.

[If you the read the piece I wrote on ratios it would be very easy to know all my interests intersect. Music, cooking, coding, baking, woodworking, photography, and others have a thread woven through them for me which I endeavor to exploit. The technical similarity makes for a warm welcome. And while ratios bring some rigor to the process, in the end they inform the process of design and composition and can be extracted from designs as well. A tool on the road to making a point that comes and goes like a barn swallow. The Anarchist’s Design Book. That’s aesthetic anarchy. Not the stuff that passes for anarchy in the news these days. You don’t have to build furniture or work with wood to be impacted by Schwarz’s books. It’s as much about eliminating consumerism, stewardship, and the cost of things. The tool chest in the first book in this series was a metaphor as much as a reality.

And if you love beautiful design rendered as tools, go convince Raney to sell you something. You won’t regret it.]

NY State bill that bans the sale of smartphones

Why Apple Defends Encryption:

Now is the time when we get to decide if we have a right to privacy and security, and the limits of our government for the digital age. It won’t happen because of public statements by tech leaders. No, it’s up to us to make our opinions about online privacy and security known to our elected representatives, in order to determine the limits of policing (and protecting) by consent.

In fact, you have an opportunity to weigh in right now. A bill has been introduced in New York State that would ban the sale of smartphones within the state unless they can be decrypted and unlocked by the manufacturer. It’s astonishingly misguided, and for those who want express their disbelief that elected representatives could be so ignorant of technology (and geography), you can set up an account with the New York State Senate, vote against it, and even leave comments.

Then, just sit back and wait for the next ignorant statement or misguided piece of legislation, because these issues aren’t going to be resolved easily, quickly, or definitively.

[I’ve nothing to add here. Go let your feelings be known!]

Ringling Elephants, the price of freedom

Ringling Bros. elephants to get an early retirement says CNN.

Even this makes me uncomfortable… but maybe we know just enough about these animals to keep them relatively content and happy. Maybe.

I can easily recall the excitement as child of going to the zoo and the circus and seeing all the greater than life animals. But it also wasn’t too long before zoo’s and circuses started to be a bit depressing looking at caged animals that aren’t hurt or in some way incapacitated.

Zoos made me think about the current election, because so many folks want a government that tells them bed time stories about being cared for, and rewarded for existing, and protected. Something no government can provide.

Life contains risk. Living is risk. Stop believing that it can be melted away. If it isn’t cutting yourself making breakfast, or limbing a tree, or crashing your bike, or falling down stairs, or terrorists, or thieves, or… the list is truly infinite. It’s also believing in yourself and trying to make your way through the world knowing what is truly important.

If you want to see what minimized risk looks like, go look at a caged tiger pacing its tiny cell. That’s what the price of freedom looks like. And I don’t want anyone to try and provide that level of comfort. Maybe my mother. But that’s it.